GED Language Arts Writing Practice Test 1
Please take a moment to complete this quiz.
The passage below will be used for 15 questions. Read the passage and answer question <1>

DIRECTIONS: In the passage below, certain phrases are underlined and numbered <x>. The question will present alternatives for the underlined part.  In most cases. you are to choose the one that best expresses the idea, makes the statement appropriate for standard written English, or is worded most consistently with the style and tone of the passage as a whole. If you think the original version is the best, choose "NO CHANGE".


Although my friends and family were skeptical of whether <1> I would be safe, I boarded the plane in New York boldly <2>and flew to Haiti. My college roommate had agreed to take medical supplies to a rural clinic where his brother was a physician, and I agreed to go and help.

When me and my roommate <3>landed at the airport in the capital Port au Prince, the chaos inside the airport was frightening. Dozens of men approached us while gesturing to our luggage, and yelling at us in Creole. They wanted us to select their taxis. I was thrilled <4>when my roommate smiled at someone who called our names through the crowd.

Papi, our designated transporter, was a Haitian man in his early twenties who works <5>for the physician. He warmly welcomed us to his country, and seemed to have a great sense of humor.<6> He laughed nonstop during our ride through the capital city. Once we were on the open highway, Papi taught us basic Creole greetings to pass the time during our excessively long four-hour commute. <7> 

The mountainous town where we would spend the week was beautiful, and I immediately fell in love with the place and its people. The views rocked! <8>Even though I could not fluently speak Creole, I made the most of my time with the land and its inhabitants. Several daily tasks kept me busy that week. The medical clinic was a modest two-room building, and their <9>staff needed help reorganizing the supply pantry. I removed, counted, sorted, and restocked supplies, <10>before adding the additional resources we brought from the United States. After I cleaned and organized the supply pantry, I assisted a visiting nutritionist with distributing vitamins to the locals. <11>

Each evening, two dozen young children would sit on the porch where my roommate and I stayed. They laughed constantly, they <12>always found joy in the simplest of things. They did teach <13>us to count in Creole and read children’s stories to us in French. They invited us to kick balls with them and chase yard chickens. Even though they did not have many toys, the children entertained one another with conversation, laughter and storytelling.

When it was time to leave Haiti and return to New York, I was sad to say goodbye.  Although my roommate and I delivered medical supplies to their community, the people gave us memories that will last the rest of our lives.<14>  

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GED Test Information

The GED (General Educational Development) Tests are a set of five subject tests designed to certify that a student has the academic skills normally acquired by completing a typical high school program of study.  The GED Tests are always given in person at one of 3,400 testing locations nationwide.  Candidates for the GED tests are individuals who have not earned a high school diploma. 

The GED Tests are standardized regularly by testing a sample of graduating high school seniors. This standardization process sets the benchmark that candidates must achieve to earn a GED credential.  Currently, students pass the tests by achieving a GED score higher than the top 60 percent of graduating high school seniors. The GED credential is issued by the state (territory or province) that the student resides in.  The GED credential is typically considered to be equivalent to a high school diploma.

GED Scores

Your GED Scores are comprised of two items: your GED standard score and your percentile rank.  Each of the five main GED tests (writing, social studies, science, reading, mathematics) is scored on a scale of 200-800.  The percentile rank ranges from 1 to 99.

The GED Standard Score is intended to compare your performance relative to graduating seniors who took the test.  The scoring system is normalized so that the average standard score is 500 for each test in the battery (i.e., about half of the seniors who took the test scored 500 or above).

The percentile rank measures how you did relative to graduating seniors who took the test.  For example, if your percentile rank were 74, it would imply that 74% of the graduating seniors who took the test score at or below your score.

Your GED test score is determined by first calculating your raw score, and then determining a scaled score.  Your raw GED Score is determined by giving you 1 point for each correct answer and 0 points for each incorrect answer.  Your raw score is then “equated” to derive a scaled score.  A scaled score reduces the impact of different test versions and the students who take specific versions.


Some questions are from the following sources:

Erik Jacobsen at

From the New York State Education Department. "High School Regents Examinations".  Internet. Available from; accessed 8/29/2011.

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