Aptitude Tests

It is becoming more common for employers to use aptitude tests as part of their pre-hiring process. If you find yourself having to pass an aptitude test to make it to the next stage with a potential employer, don't worry. With the right preparations and understanding of the assessment, you can easily prepare and test with confidence.

What is an Aptitude Test?

Aptitude tests differ from most traditional tests as they are less about remembering facts and more about your mental ability and logical reasoning. Simply put, Aptitude tests are designed to assess the way you think and understand information and determine what personality traits are your strongest.

Aptitude Test RECOMMENDED STUDY RESOURCES

Most of the companies that provide aptitude tests also provide sample questions to review on their website, but one of the best ways to prepare for an aptitude test is with the All-Inclusive Assessment Test Master Pack. This resource is great because it will help you prepare regardless of what aptitude test a potential employer decides to give you. 

The All-Inclusive Assessment Test Master Pack includes the following sections:

  1. Numerical Abilities
  2. Verbal Abilities
  3. English Language
  4. Abstract Thinking
  5. Behavioral Tendencies
  6. Job-Related Skills
  7. Mechanical Reasoning

This resource is an all-in-one resouce that will include anything you need to help you prepare for any aptitude test you find yourself having to take. 

If you are serious about doing well on your aptitude test, try the All-Inclusive Assessment Test Master Pack - our recommended study resource. 

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How to Prepare for your Aptitude Test

Once you get the word you will need to take an aptitude test, try and find out which assessment you will be taking. This information will help you to make the most of your study time.

No matter the resource you decide to use, it is best to spend some time looking at all the material that may be in the assessment first. Look at how questions and their answers are structured, how many questions are in each section, and how many different sections there are in total. 

After you have a good understanding of what is on the assessments, it is a great idea to take a timed practice run. After taking the practice assessment, it is smart to look over your score and answer choices. 

Your potential employer is giving this exam to ensure you have the necessary skills to complete the job. Do your answers line up with the job you are applying for? Is your score an accurate representation of your skill sets? If not, decide which areas need improvement and focus your attention there first. 

Once you feel you have spent adequate time reviewing the needed sections, try a timed practice test again, and compare your results to what you got the first time around.

Aptitude Tests

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Why is my potential employer asking me to take an aptitude test?

The hiring process can be time consuming and expensive. The average small to medium-sized U.S company can spend over $40,000 a year on onboarding new employees alone. With numbers like that, employers are turning to resources like Aptitude Tests to make sure they hire the right person for the job, the first time around. 

It is hard to tell from a person's resume and interview how well they will perform the job tasks, handle certain situations, and fit in with the company culture. An aptitude test gives employers a more comprehensive picture of who they are looking to hire and allows them to make better hiring decisions.

What to expect from an aptitude test

There are many different types of aptitude tests, but most of them generally follow the same structure. The aptitude test you are asked to take will likely be multiple choice. Some tests have only a few questions with unlimited time to answer, while others give you a certain amount of time to see how many questions you can correctly answer in that time. 

No matter what the structure, most aptitude tests range in time from 10 minutes to 1 hour to complete. If a time limit is given on an aptitude test, it is usually in place to provide an element of challenge to the exam.

Most aptitude tests are administered online. You will likely receive a link to complete the aptitude test from a potential employer and be given a window of time, typically a few days, to complete it. Your score will then automatically be available to your potential employer.

Different types of aptitude tests

Verbal Reasoning

These types of assessments tests how well you understand and communicate. There are generally four sections tested on a verbal reasoning exam.

  1. Spelling - You will get several different spellings of the same word and need to choose which spelling is correct.
  2. Grammar – You will get several different sentences and be asked to pick which one is grammatically correct.
  3. Comprehension – You will be given a short passage to read and then be asked questions to gauge your understanding of what you just read.
  4. Defining words – You will be given a word and asked to choose the correct definition, or you may be asked to find a word that means the opposite of the word given.

This is the most common type of aptitude test given because all jobs require some form of understanding and decision making based on information given either verbally or in writing.

Numerical Reasoning

This type of assessment tests your ability to understand numbers and use them appropriately. You will generally be given a graph, set of numbers, or table of mathematical equations and asked multiple-choice questions to demonstrate your understanding of what you have been given.  

This type of assessment is often given for administrative and managerial positions, as well as clerical jobs.

Inductive Reasoning Tests

This type of assessment is sometimes called an abstract or diagrammatic reasoning test. They are used to test your ability to understand logic, identify patterns, and then develop a solution based on the information you have been given.

This type of assessment is often used for technical jobs where you would utilize abstract thinking to solve problems.

Scoring Aptitude Tests

Because Aptitude tests are assessing your abilities and understanding, they are not usually scored as a pass-fail. Instead, you will receive a percentile that shows how you scored in specific areas compared to others who have taken the test. 

Employers have a good idea of what areas they would like job candidates to score high (and low in some cases) in, and that will be what they look for when they receive your results. Taking the time to understand what your potential employer is looking for will help you achieve a desirable score.

It is also important to note that you will not receive a copy of your aptitude test score from the testing company in many cases. Scores are usually sent to the hiring manager, and then it is up to them to share those results with you.  

Taking the time to find out what your potential employer is looking for and reviewing your aptitude test structure will significantly improve your chances of getting your ideal score. 

Aptitude Test FAQs

Is my Aptitude score a significant factor in getting the job?

Each company’s hiring process is different; however, it is safe to say that a company that invests in using Aptitude tests when hiring places some importance on the score.

It is expensive for companies to hire and train a new employee. Therefore, it is in their best interest to spend the time and money to hire the right person.

What kind of companies use aptitude tests in their hiring process?

Companies large and small use Aptitude tests to ensure their new hires have the skills necessary to complete the job. They also use aptitude tests to make sure anyone they bring on will fit in with the companies’ culture.

Some examples of companies that utilize aptitude tests are Johnson & Johnson, Apple, Nike, and BP.

What are employers looking for when they give an aptitude test?

Each company and position will have a different ideal score, but there are some things you can do to find out what a company is looking for even if they will not tell you that information outright.

The job posting you applied for likely had a list of traits in their ideal candidate for the desired position. This is a great place to start.

A quick search of the company’s website can give you a glimpse of their company culture and what they may be looking for in a personality fit.

What if I don't get the right score on my aptitude test?

Aptitude tests are generally not scored on a pass-fail basis. They are used to gauge different abilities and personality traits compared to others who have taken the test.

For that reason, it is great to prepare and put your best foot forward, but if you do not get the score you were aiming for, don't be discouraged. Different companies are looking for different strengths.

An aptitude test can also be used to tell if a company is a good fit for your skills and personality. Ultimately hiring the right person for the right job is best for both the employer and the employee.

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