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Free LSAT Practice Tests (2019)

Free LSAT Practice Tests

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is a standardized test used in the admissions process for most law schools in the United States and Canada. While some law schools do accept scores from tests other than the LSAT, the LSAT is the only test accepted by all ABA-accredited law schools in the United States, as well as all Canadian common-law law schools. The best way to prepare for the LSAT is by taking LSAT practice tests.

The LSAT was developed in order to assess the necessary skills needed in order to be successful in law school, including:

  • Reading Comprehension
  • Analytical Reasoning
  • Logical Reasoning

Performance on The LSAT Test is vital for any student wishing to attend an ABA-accredited law school in the United States, or any common-law law school in Canada. 

LSAT practice tests and other resources are available for those interested in preparing for their LSAT Test.

 LSAT Practice Tests and Recommended Study Resources

There are many online resources available for those looking to prepare for the LSAT Test. Many of these resources can be found absolutely free online, such as:

Free LSAT Practice Exams and Sample Questions

Resource Provider
 LSAT Practice Test (PDF) LSAC 
 LSAT Practice Test  Khan Academy
 LSAT Practice Test Princeton Review 
 LSAT Sample Questions Kaplan 
 LSAT Sample Questions Peterson's 

 Free Study Guides, Flashcards, and Other Materials

Resource Provider
 LSAT Study Guides Union Test Prep 
 LSAT Study Guide AlphaScore 
LSAT Study Guide (PDF)   Magoosh
 LSAT Flashcards VarsityTutors 
 LSAT Flashcards Quizlet 

LSAT Test Content Description

The LSAT includes four seperate scored multiple-choice sections, and one unscored writing sample. Each scored section is comprised entirely of multiple-choice questions, and candidates are given 35 minutes to complete each section. The included sections are as follows:

  • Logical Reasoning Section 1
  • Logical Reasoning Section 2
  • Analytical Reasoning
  • Reading Comprehension
  • Writing Sample

Be sure you are utilizing all available LSAT practice tests in order to ensure you are familiar with each different section of the LSAT. The LSAT test is comprised of the following subtests: 

Logical Reasoning Section 1 (24-26 items, 35 minutes)

The Logical Reasoning Section 1 portion of the LSAT is designed to assess the candidates ability to analyze and evaluate arguments and assess validity. Candidates will be required to determine an argument’s strength or weakness, as well as what causes the argument to be strong or weak.

This section includes 24-26 argument-based multiple choice questions, and candidates are given 35 minutes to complete it.

Logical Reasoning Section 2 (24-26 items, 35 minutes)

The Logical Reasoning Section 2 portion of the LSAT is identical to the Logical Reasoning Section 1 portion, just with different questions. Like its predecessor, it is designed to assess the candidates ability to analyze and evaluate arguments and assess validity. Candidates will be required to determine an argument’s strength or weakness, as well as what causes the argument to be strong or weak.

This section includes 24-26 argument-based multiple choice questions, and candidates are given 35 minutes to complete it.

Analytical Reasoning Section (23-24 items, 35 minutes)

The Analytical Reasoning Section of the LSAT is often referred to as the “Logic Games” portion of the test. Candidates must use deductive reasoning and find structure within a set of organized data in order to demonstrate their skills in basic logic. Some skills required in order to be successful on this section of the test may include:

  • Matching Skills
  • Sequencing Skills
  • Both Matching and Sequencing Skills

This section includes 23-24 multiple choice questions which are based on the included “Logic Games” passages. Candidates are given 35 minutes to complete it.

Reading Comprehension Section (26-28 items, 35 minutes)

The Reading Comprehension Section of the LSAT assesses a candidate’s ability to read and comprehend a given scholarly passage. Some skills required in order to be successful on this section of the test may include:

  • Identifying Main Idea and Details
  • Drawing Inferences
  • Making Extrapolations

This section includes 26-28 multiple choice questions which are based on the included scholarly passages. Candidates are given 35 minutes to complete it.

Writing Sample (1 essay, 35 minutes)

The Writing Sample Section of the LSAT is not graded, but is sent to law schools and may be used in their admission process. On this section, candidates are asked to argue one particular position over another. Candidates will be expected to not only support their own position, but also to knock down the opposing position.

This section includes 1 essay question in which the writer will support one position while knocking down the other. Candidates are given 35 minutes to complete it.

It is important to use the appropriate LSAT practice tests and study materials in order to be prepared for each section of the LSAT.

LSAT Test Administration

The LSAT Test is administered at hundreds of testing sites across the United States and Canada, and is offered four times per year. Once they have earned their bachelor’s degree, candidates may take their LSAT in June, October, December, or February, and it is offered on Wednesdays and Saturdays. Be sure to register as soon as you know what date works for you, as testing centers have a limited capacity and operate on a first-come-first-served basis. 

Your admission ticket will include all of the following information:

  • Test Date
  • Reporting Time
  • Reporting Address
  • Any Additional Instructions

Please note that you must register for your LSAT in advance, as registration will not be permitted on the day of the test. Candidates may not bring any electronic devices into the test center, and may not access the exam room for any reason prior to their test.

LSAT Test Fees

LSAT Test scheduling fees are as follows:

Item or Package Fee
 LSAT (including LSAT writing) $200 
 Credential Assembly Service (CAS) $195 
 Law School Report $45 
 Package #1: LSAT (including LSAT Writing), CAS, 1 Law School Report $430 
 Package #2: LSAT (including LSAT Writing), CAS, 6 Law School Reports $650 
LSAT Writing Test Only $15 

 Since the LSAT is a particularly expensive test, it is recommended that you utilize all available free LSAT practice tests and other resources in order to maximize your chances of success.

 LSAT Candidacy Requirements

Anyone applying to an ABA-accredited law school in the United States, or a Canadian common-law law school, should take the LSAT. 

LSAT Test Scores

The LSAT score is based on the candidate’s raw score, which is simply the number of questions which were answered correctly.

All questions are weighted the same, so which particular questions a candidate answered correctly or incorrectly does not matter; all that matters is the total number of questions answered correctly.

Unanswered questions are scored the same as incorrectly answered questions, so test takers should make sure each question is answered, as there is no penalty for guessing. 

Your raw score will be converted and scaled on a range from 120 (lowest possible score) to 180 (highest possible score).

Percentile ranks are also provided on your score report. This section of the score report indicates what percentage of test takers scored as good as or lower than the test taker.

LSAT Test F.A.Q.

Question: What questions do they ask on the LSAT?

Answer: The LSAT includes four seperate scored multiple-choice sections, and one unscored writing sample. Each scored section is comprised entirely of multiple-choice questions, and candidates are given 35 minutes to complete each section. The included sections are as follows:

  • Logical Reasoning Section 1
  • Logical Reasoning Section 2
  • Analytical Reasoning
  • Reading Comprehension
  • Writing Sample

Be sure you are utilizing all available LSAT practice tests in order to ensure you are familiar with each different section of the LSAT.

Question: How are LSATs scored?

Answer: The LSAT score is based on the candidate’s raw score, which is simply the number of questions which were answered correctly.

All questions are weighted the same, so which particular questions a candidate answered correctly or incorrectly does not matter; all that matters is the total number of questions answered correctly.

Unanswered questions are scored the same as incorrectly answered questions, so test takers should make sure each question is answered, as there is no penalty for guessing. 

Your raw score will be converted and scaled on a range from 120 (lowest possible score) to 180 (highest possible score).

Question: Can anyone take the LSAT?

Answer: Anyone applying to an ABA-accredited law school in the United States, or a Canadian common-law law school, should take the LSAT.

Question: How should I prepare for the LSAT?

Answer: One of the best ways to prepare for the LSAT is by taking LSAT practice tests. By taking practice tests, you are able to figure out which content you know best, and which content you may still need to study. 

Question: What is a good score on the LSAT?

Answer: Each answer you get correct counts as one point. The LSAT is scored between 120 and 180. The average score is around 150. If you are looking to get into a top 25 law school, you will want to achieve a score above 160. 

Question: How many times can I take the LSAT?

Answer: There used to be a limit on the number of times one could take the LSAT. As of September 2017, there is no limit. Applicants are able to take the LSAT as many times as they would like. As far as reporting goes, all of your LSAT results are automatically reported to law schools (even absences and cancellations). 

The LSAT Test is an important step for anyone entering an ABA- accredited law school. Make sure you are utilizing all available studying materials and LSAT practice tests so you can take the next step in your education today.

 Last Updated: 07/09/2019